Monthly Archives: August 2014

GOT Ascent sell sword backstories 2

Longclaw 7

Wynafryd Byrch
Wynafryd was born in King’s Landing just after Robert’s Rebellion. She aspired to be a member of the city guard, however Robert Baratheon himself said she would be better as a nursemaid. Wynafryd left for Dorne where she briefly trained under Obara Sand. The eldest daughter of Oberyn gifted Wynafryd with her own spear and recommended her to join House Falfaren.

Marwyn Rivers
Marwyn is a bastard born in the Riverlands. He is the son of a lord of House Charlton and a prostitute from Essos. Marwyn was given to farmers who in service to House Tully. He contemplated going to the Wall until he met Luceon Tremond. The two became lovers and fled the Riverlands to Dorne. Luceon met Alamaris Falfaren who saw Marwyn’s prowess with a sword and let him and Luceon in his house. Marwyn currently train’s Jeyne, Alamaris’ daughter.

Luceon Tremond
Luceon was a squire to a lord of House Tully. He lived in the Riverlands all of his life until he met Marwyn Rivers. The two fell in love and were scored upon by the nobility in the area. They traveled for six months before arriving in Dorne. During a training session, the two met Alamaris Falfaren, who invited him into his home. Luceon is skilled in leather working and makes some of the armor for House Falfaren’s troops.

Ysilla Clegane
Her mother was a maiden of House Clegane who lived in the North and her father was a fisherman. Ysilla studied under the Faceless Men and was assigned to kill a member of House Dayne. However Alamaris intercepted her. He offered her a place at his house and she accepted. While most warriors like to fight on the battlefield, Ysilla likes to stick in the shadows.

Vaelyn Mott
Vaelyn is a northerner born on Bear Island. He spent most of his life as a tracker and a fisherman. His shaggy beard has earned him the nickname “Gnarly Bear.” On his 20th birthday, Valeyn was accused of a rape that was actually performed by a friend. Although he was cleared of the charges, his reputation was never the same. During the War of Five Kings, Valeyn served under Robb Stark before sustaining an injury in battle. Near the end of the war, Vaelyn was tasked with trying to find allies. He was captured by bandits and left to die. He was found by Dalbridge Locke, who offered to take him to Dorne. When they arrived, Dalbridge recommended to Almaris Falfaren to bring him to the house and the knight accepted.

Victor Hunt
Victor is a blacksmith born of House Hunt of the Reach. He briefly served the Targaryens before Robert’s Rebellion. An injury forced him onto the sidelines. As he recovered, Victor focused his skills on forging and became a skilled blacksmith. During Robert’s Rebellion, Victor was unable to ride to battle. He decided to go South until he reached Dorne. He and Alamaris Falfaren became fast friends. He currently serves as one House Falfaren’s blacksmiths.

Genna Stone
Genna was born in the Vale to a prostitute and a Dornish nobile. Genna spent most of her youth as a serving girl. She developed superior knife-fighting skills, as well as an interest in warfare. When she reached womanhood, her mother gave her enough money to start a life for herself. Genna traveled to Dorne to search for her father. When she found the man, Genna learned he had a family. However, he decided to let her in his house. One day her skills caught the eye of Alamaris, who offered a place in his house.

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10 Books that stayed with me

This morning I saw one of my old teachers from high school post a challenge one of his friends gave to him. He had to list 10 books that have stuck with him over the years. Being an English teacher and a writer he’s had many. So like any teacher he just listed the ones who influenced him.

I decided to do this myself and list 10 books that have stuck with me over the years. Some of these books influenced my writing. Others inspired me along my journey. And there are some that I enjoyed because of the story.

  1. Dragons of Spring Dawning by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman
  2. At the Fights by Thomas Hauser
  3. God in My Corner by George Foreman
  4. Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga by Hunter S. Thompson
  5. A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin
  6. Mythology by Edith Hamilton
  7. Partners in Crime by Agatha Christie
  8. Lord of the Clans by Christie Golden
  9. The Gunslinger by Stephen King
  10. Inside Reporting by Tim Harrower


What are some books that have stuck with you over the years? Let me know in the comments.

The Dragonlance Chronicles novels were based on a series of Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) game modules.[1] The Chronicles trilogy came about because the designers wanted novels to tell the story of the game world they were creating, something to which TSR, Inc. (TSR) agreed only reluctantly.[2] Soon after Tracy Hickman came to TSR in 1982, management announced the intention to develop his series of dragons based role-playing adventures.[3] Hickman’s storyline was chosen for the Dragonlance books due to the 12 part storyline.[4] Hickman’s proposal resulted in the Dragonlance Chronicles, which led to his association with Margaret Weis.[3] Weis was assigned to edit Hickman’s “Project Overlord,” as it was initially called, a novel intended to be coordinated with a trilogy of AD&D modules. Weis and her new partner, Tracy Hickman, worked to plot the novel; they had hired an author, who didn’t work out, but by that time, Weis and Hickman were so into the project that they felt they had to write it.[5] Jean Black, the Managing Editor of TSR’s Book Department, picked Hickman and Weis to write Dragons of Autumn Twilight and the rest of the Dragonlance Chronicles series.[6]:16 The storyline of the original Dragonlance series had been plotted and outlined before either the novel trilogy or the games were written

Airway Heights Festival Photos part 3

And finally, part 3 of my Airway Heights Festival photos.

fords unlimted car show 1

fords unlimted car show 2

NEWS - Mattie Burgess AGT - 08282014

Gardner

NEWS - Alex Fry AGT - 08282014

Airway Heights is a city in Spokane County, Washington, United States, just west of Spokane. The population was 6,114 at the 2010 census. The city’s name was taken from its close proximity to the runways at Fairchild Air Force Base and Spokane International Airport.[5]

Airway Heights was officially incorporated on June 28, 1955.

Development[edit]
Growth in the City was spurred by the opening of the Airway Heights Corrections Center by the Washington State Department of Corrections in 1992 and the opening of the Northern Quest Resort & Casino by the Kalispel Indian Tribe in 2000. More recently, with the addition of a new Wal-Mart Supercenter, several new apartment buildings and housing developments, and the expansion of the Northern Quest Casino, Airway Heights is continuing to grow. Also, the Spokane County Raceway Park is located in Airway Heights, and features major automobile events, including drag racing, stock car racing, and occasional monster truck shows.

Geography[edit]
Airway Heights is located at 47°38′37″N 117°35′11″W (47.643648, -117.586491).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.63 square miles (14.58 km2), all of it land.[1]

The community lies in the northeastern corner of the flat Columbia Plateau. While the plateau tends to be flat, the terrain locally is quite rugged as it is part of the Channeled Scablands. The “heights” in the city’s name references its location at a higher elevation than the city center of Spokane. Traveling into Airway Heights along Highway 2, the main road into the city, from Downtown Spokane, one will climb over 500 feet.

Highway 2 is the main east-west thoroughfare in the city. It connects Airway Heights with Fairchild to the west and Spokane to the east. Interstate 90 runs just a few miles south of the city.

2010 census[edit]
As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,114 people, 1,547 households, and 1,035 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,086.0 inhabitants per square mile (419.3/km2). There were 1,727 housing units at an average density of 306.7 per square mile (118.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 78.5% White, 7.2% African American, 3.7% Native American, 3.5% Asian, 0.9% Pacific Islander, 1.8% from other races, and 4.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.3% of the population.

There were 1,547 households of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.1% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 34.6 years. 17.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 11.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 40.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.2% were from 45 to 64; and 5.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 67.7% male and 32.3% female.

Airway Heights Festival Photos part 2

Here is part 2 of the photos.

festival 1

NEWS - Jim Scott - 08282014

NEWS - Ford Model T - 08282014

NEWS - car show - 08282014

Airway Heights is a city in Spokane County, Washington, United States, just west of Spokane. The population was 6,114 at the 2010 census. The city’s name was taken from its close proximity to the runways at Fairchild Air Force Base and Spokane International Airport.[5]

Airway Heights was officially incorporated on June 28, 1955.

Development[edit]
Growth in the City was spurred by the opening of the Airway Heights Corrections Center by the Washington State Department of Corrections in 1992 and the opening of the Northern Quest Resort & Casino by the Kalispel Indian Tribe in 2000. More recently, with the addition of a new Wal-Mart Supercenter, several new apartment buildings and housing developments, and the expansion of the Northern Quest Casino, Airway Heights is continuing to grow. Also, the Spokane County Raceway Park is located in Airway Heights, and features major automobile events, including drag racing, stock car racing, and occasional monster truck shows.

Geography[edit]
Airway Heights is located at 47°38′37″N 117°35′11″W (47.643648, -117.586491).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.63 square miles (14.58 km2), all of it land.[1]

The community lies in the northeastern corner of the flat Columbia Plateau. While the plateau tends to be flat, the terrain locally is quite rugged as it is part of the Channeled Scablands. The “heights” in the city’s name references its location at a higher elevation than the city center of Spokane. Traveling into Airway Heights along Highway 2, the main road into the city, from Downtown Spokane, one will climb over 500 feet.

Highway 2 is the main east-west thoroughfare in the city. It connects Airway Heights with Fairchild to the west and Spokane to the east. Interstate 90 runs just a few miles south of the city.

2010 census[edit]
As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,114 people, 1,547 households, and 1,035 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,086.0 inhabitants per square mile (419.3/km2). There were 1,727 housing units at an average density of 306.7 per square mile (118.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 78.5% White, 7.2% African American, 3.7% Native American, 3.5% Asian, 0.9% Pacific Islander, 1.8% from other races, and 4.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.3% of the population.

There were 1,547 households of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.1% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 34.6 years. 17.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 11.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 40.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.2% were from 45 to 64; and 5.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 67.7% male and 32.3% female.

Airway Heights Festival Photos part 1

Here are some photos I took at the Airway Heights festival last week.

NEWS - Ford Model T 2- 08282014

festival 4

festival 3

festival 2

Airway Heights is a city in Spokane County, Washington, United States, just west of Spokane. The population was 6,114 at the 2010 census. The city’s name was taken from its close proximity to the runways at Fairchild Air Force Base and Spokane International Airport.[5]

Airway Heights was officially incorporated on June 28, 1955.

Development[edit]
Growth in the City was spurred by the opening of the Airway Heights Corrections Center by the Washington State Department of Corrections in 1992 and the opening of the Northern Quest Resort & Casino by the Kalispel Indian Tribe in 2000. More recently, with the addition of a new Wal-Mart Supercenter, several new apartment buildings and housing developments, and the expansion of the Northern Quest Casino, Airway Heights is continuing to grow. Also, the Spokane County Raceway Park is located in Airway Heights, and features major automobile events, including drag racing, stock car racing, and occasional monster truck shows.

Geography[edit]
Airway Heights is located at 47°38′37″N 117°35′11″W (47.643648, -117.586491).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.63 square miles (14.58 km2), all of it land.[1]

The community lies in the northeastern corner of the flat Columbia Plateau. While the plateau tends to be flat, the terrain locally is quite rugged as it is part of the Channeled Scablands. The “heights” in the city’s name references its location at a higher elevation than the city center of Spokane. Traveling into Airway Heights along Highway 2, the main road into the city, from Downtown Spokane, one will climb over 500 feet.

Highway 2 is the main east-west thoroughfare in the city. It connects Airway Heights with Fairchild to the west and Spokane to the east. Interstate 90 runs just a few miles south of the city.

2010 census[edit]
As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,114 people, 1,547 households, and 1,035 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,086.0 inhabitants per square mile (419.3/km2). There were 1,727 housing units at an average density of 306.7 per square mile (118.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 78.5% White, 7.2% African American, 3.7% Native American, 3.5% Asian, 0.9% Pacific Islander, 1.8% from other races, and 4.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.3% of the population.

There were 1,547 households of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.1% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 34.6 years. 17.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 11.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 40.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.2% were from 45 to 64; and 5.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 67.7% male and 32.3% female.

WunderWoman triathlon is a wondrous event

SPORTS - Triathlon runners - 08212014

It’s normal to see people at Waterfront Park on the weekend. It’s a good place for families to have a picnic in the early afternoon or to do some swimming.

This past weekend I was surprised to see over 600 women from all over the Inland Northwest — along with their families and friends — at the park, just as the sun was coming up, for this year’s WunderWoman triathlon, on Sunday, Aug. 17.

The triathlon began with the Olympic Distance competitors swimming 1,200 meters in the lake. The second leg of the race was a 40K bike ride south on State Route 902 and into Malloy Prairie Road before making a left on Clear Lake Road.

The final part of the race was a 10K run on the asphalt trails through Medical Lake.

Athletes who competed in the Sprint Distance group only had a quarter-mile swim, a 10.2-mile bike ride and a three-mile run.

As a man, I was inspired as I watched these women in all age groups giving it their all. I too became one of the spectators, cheering on over 600 strangers as they raced across the finish line.

The triathlon wasn’t just an event for these women to show off their mettle. Marla Emde, of Emde Sports, said the event aimed to raise awareness of the need for bone health. All proceeds go to local bone health education through Washington Osteoporosis Coalition.

“This event continues to build year after year,” Emde said.

The day before the triathlon, men, women and children participated in the Strides for Strong Bones three-mile run/walk through the park. The fun run drew men, women and athletes from around the Northwest including Kearan Nelson, a Central Valley high school cross-country runner.

“I’m always looking for 5Ks to run and I learned about this race,” Nelson said. “I like that we’re running for osteoporosis (awareness).”

Learning that the triathlon and the fun run raised money and awareness toward a cause like osteoporosis was a refreshing break from the videos of people dumping ice on their heads that are flooding the internet.

I’m not knocking anyone who has given money to the ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) Association, especially those who donated and take the bucket of ice.

ALS, also known as Lou Gerhig’s disease, is something we should be raising awareness about. However, there are other avenues — more productive — for us to donate money to a charity or a cause than just dumping a bucket of ice on our heads.

Training to run a 5K race may not be easy — especially for those like myself who don’t run a lot, which I hope to change — but you’re still raising money and awareness for a cause and it goes toward benefiting your health. You’re also not wasting water during a time when areas of the country are going through a drought. There are races benefiting charities happening throughout the year — you just have to find one.

Something that peaked my interest at the triathlon were the several educational opportunities for folks to learn about bone health.

There was a panel discussion, a question and answer session following with experts on osteoporosis.

For adults over the age of 30 years old, there was a free ultrasound heel bone density screening.

It’s easy to overlook educational opportunities like this, especially if you’re tired after finishing a long race. But if you’re given a chance to not only give money to a charity, but also receive some free education on how you can better your health, you should take it.

Like many events held in Medical Lake over the summer, the triathlon had hundreds of folks from outside of the community.

Down the road, maybe the city could find ways to bring some of the athletes and their families into the community to enjoy some of the local restaurants in the downtown area like the Baja Mexican Restaurant or Pizza Factory.

Stephanie McMahon and the Four Horsewomen

Much to the dismay of fans, it’s not uncommon to see the worlds of professional wrestling and mixed martial arts intersect with each other. Although MMA purists are known to bash wrestling and fans, mixed martial artists have been spotted at WWE or TNA events – and vice versa. One is scripted and the other is an actual sport, but the fighters and performers respect each other.

While I wasn’t surprised that Ronda Rousey, Shayna Baszler, Jessamyn Duke and Marina Shafir were at WWE’s Summerslam last weekend The WWE cameras didn’t acknowledge her at first, but through tweets and Instagram photos – as well as Ric Flair saying “Ronda Rousey” four times – you knew the UFC champion and her friends were there. However, I was surprised when Stephanie McMahon came down to the ring in wrestling gear – the first time in over 10 years – and flashed the four fingers to the quartet of fighters in the front row.

Stephanie’s interaction with the Four didn’t stop at the pay per view. After the show, Rousey and the gang helped her with her ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

This brought a Wayne’s World “no way” reaction – a good “no way” reaction. Although I’ve been a Ronda Rousey fan since her rise to prominence in March 2012, I have always had a thing for The Billion Dollar Princess. I guess you could say that I have always been a Stephanie McMahon guy.

I don’t think I was ever so excited to see these two worlds collide.

Stephanie McMahon Levesque[9][10] (born Stephanie Marie McMahon; September 24, 1976),[7] also known professionally as Stephanie McMahon, is an American businesswoman, and Chief Brand Officer (CBO) of WWE. She is currently the on-screen commissioner of WWE’s weekly television show Raw.

A fourth generation wrestling promoter as a member of the McMahon family, she has worked for WWE since she was a teenager (modeling T-shirts and other merchandise for various WWE catalogs) working her way up to receptionist, then in various front office jobs up to and including her current CBO position. She is the great-granddaughter of Roderick “Jess” McMahon, granddaughter of Vincent J. McMahon, daughter of WWE Chairman and CEO Vince McMahon and retired WWE CEO/Trump cabinet member Linda McMahon, the younger sister of WWE part-owner/wrestler Shane McMahon, and wife of WWE executive/wrestler Paul “Triple H” Levesque.