Monthly Archives: November 2014

Fight Theater: Jessica Penne

Former Invicta FC atomweight champion Jessica Penne took one step closer to making history after she defeating Aisling Daly in their quarterfinal match of “The Ultimate Fighter: A Champion Will be Crowned” women’s strawweight title tournament. If she wins the whole enchilada, she will not only become the first UFC women’s strawweight champion but also be the first fighter to hold world titles in the UFC and Invicta Fighting Championships.

I’ve enjoyed watching Penne’s progress over the years and I see her coming out of this tournament as one of the top fighters in the UFC’s women’s 115-pound weight class.

Below are some videos of Penne’s triumphs.


Jessica Penne vs. Lisa Ellis


Jessica Penne vs. Lisa Ellis II


Jessica Penne vs. Nicdali Rivera-Calanoc

 

Jessica Penne (born January 30, 1983) is an American mixed martial artist. She was the first Invicta FC Atomweight Champion. She also competed in the first women’s bout in Bellator Fighting Championships. She currently competes in the Women’s Strawweight division of the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).

In May 2009, Penne became the first woman to compete and win a bout in the Bellator Fighting Championships organization when she fought at Bellator 5 against Tammie Schneider in a 117-pound catchweight bout. She won the fight via TKO (punches) in the first round.

In August 2010, Penne met future Bellator Strawweight Champion Zoila Gurgel in the opening quarterfinal round of the Bellator Season 3 115 lb women’s tournament at Bellator 25. Gurgel won the fight via unanimous decision.

On July 3, 2014, it was announced that Penne was one of 16 contestants on The Ultimate Fighter: Team Pettis vs. Team Melendez, which would crown the Ultimate Fighting Championship’s first strawweight champion.

Penne was the fifth pick by coach Anthony Pettis. She faced Lisa Ellis in the preliminary round of the tournament and won via submission in the first round. She defeated fellow Team Pettis teammate Aisling Daly in the quarterfinals via decision win. In the semifinal round, she lost to her friend Carla Esparza by decision.

Ultimate Fighting Championship[edit]
Penne made her UFC debut on December 12, 2014 at the The Ultimate Fighter: A Champion Will Be Crowned Finale, facing fellow semifinalist Randa Markos on the main card. She won the back-and-forth fight by split decision (28–29, 30–27, and 29–28). The bout also won Penne her first Fight of the Night bonus award from the promotion.

Strawweight title shot
Penne was scheduled to face Juliana Lima on May 30, 2015 at UFC Fight Night 67. However, Penne was pulled from that bout in favor of a match-up with UFC Women’s Strawweight Champion Joanna Jędrzejczyk on June 20, 2015 at UFC Fight Night 69, after that event’s headliner bout fell apart. She lost the fight in the third round via TKO following a flurry of punches and a knee against the cage. Both participants were awarded Fight of the Night honors.

Post title shot
In her first fight following her title shot loss, Penne faced Jéssica Andrade on June 4, 2016 at UFC 199. She lost the fight via TKO in the second round.

Penne next faced Danielle Taylor on April 22, 2017 at UFC Fight Night: Swanson vs. Lobov. She lost the fight via unanimous decision.

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500th post – Changes

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Note: This is my 500th post on this blog. Thank you all for following me and I hope we can continue the journey.

First of all, I hope everyone had an amazing Thanksgiving.

One year ago I was in Wolf Point, Mont. getting ready to leave my position as editor at the Herald News – thank you Darla Downs for the opportunity to work there – and come home to work at the Cheney Free Press, having no idea how the next 12 months would shape me but that story will come down the road. For now I want to kind of focus on Thanksgiving.

This weekend I got to spend time with family and friends. I spent Turkey Day with the Salaz’s who have been my friends for the last 11 years. Their kids – who I met when they were toddlers – are all now in high school and doing great things. They’re pretty smart kids and I hope they stay on the straight and narrow.

Yesterday I bought a new car – one that wasn’t made in the ’90s. It’s a 2002 Toyota Camry and as soon as I went on the test drive, I knew it was meant for me. I also hung out with Bri and Adam – and their new friends who I’m guessing will evolve into something more.

We partied for a little bit last night, but I ended up driving home. It wasn’t that I hated being there, I just wanted to be in my own bed.  If it had been one year ago I would have been stuck there because I had no car or license at that point.

Some folks are scared of change and try to fight it – like certain Medical Lake residents – but not all changes are bad, especially if you look at the positive side of things.

Update – Sept. 18, 2017, I am doing well. I am currently living in Ritzville and working at the Ritzville Journal. Aside from trying to figure out how I will do word surgery on a story and my struggles to get ahold of a volleyball coach, I’m doing well. I’m excited for what the future brings.

Sports Editor playlist part 8

And here is eighth and final part of my Sports Editor playlist.


Mirko Crocop entrance


PRIDE GP 2006 Josh Barnett vs Rodrigo Minotauro Nogueira intro


Mauricio Shogun Rua entrance


UFC.113 Shogun Entrance


Wanderlei Silva Entrance

Pride Fighting Championships (Pride or Pride FC, founded as KRS-Pride) was a Japanese mixed martial arts promotion company founded by Nobuyuki Sakakibara and Nobuhiko Takada. Its inaugural event was held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997. Pride held more than sixty mixed martial arts events, broadcast to about 40 countries worldwide.[1] Pride held the largest live MMA event audience record of 91,107 people at the Pride and K-1 co-production, Shockwave/Dynamite, held in August 2002,[2] as well as the audience record of over 67,450 people at the Pride Final Conflict 2003. For ten years PRIDE was one of the most popular MMA organizations in the world.

In March 2007, Dream Stage Entertainment (DSE) sold Pride to Lorenzo Fertitta and Frank Fertitta III, co-owners of Zuffa, which owns the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[3] While remaining as legally separate entities with separate managements, the two promotions were set to cooperate in a manner akin to the AFL-NFL merger. However, such an arrangement did not materialize, and in October 2007, Pride Worldwide’s Japanese staff was laid off, marking the end of the organization as an active fight promoter. As a result, many of the Pride staff left to form a new organization alongside K-1 parent company Fighting and Entertainment Group. That new organization, founded in February 2008, was named Dream.[4]

In 2015, Pride’s co-founder and former president Nobuyuki Sakakibara established Rizin Fighting Federation in Japan with the same philosophy and ambition as for the defunct Pride organization.[5]

Pride Fighting Championships was initially conceived of in 1997, to match popular Japanese pro-wrestler Nobuhiko Takada with Rickson Gracie, the purported champion of the Gracie family of Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioners. The event, held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997, and organised by the KRS (Kakutougi Revolutionary Spirits) promotion, attracted 47,000 fans, as well as Japanese mass media attention. The success of the first event enabled its promoters to hold a regular series of mixed martial arts events, and a year later in 1998, to promote a rematch between Takada and Gracie.[6] With K-1 enjoying popularity in Japan, Pride began to compete with monthly showings on Fuji Television, as well as pay per view on the newly formed satellite television channel SKY PerfecTV. The series was taken over by the DSE after the dissolvement of the KRS following the fourth event and it was accordingly renamed as the Pride Fighting Championships.

In 2000, Pride hosted the first Pride Grand Prix, a two-part openweight tournament held to find the “world’s best fighter”. The tournament was held over the course of two events, with sixteen fighters competing in an opening round and the eight winners returning three months later for the final round. The second round of the tournament marked the first time Pride was broadcast in the United States and featured American fighter Mark Coleman winning the tournament by defeating Igor Vovchanchyn in the final round.

Sports Editor Playlist part 7

And here is part 7 of my Sports Editor playlist.


Genki Sudo Entrance Montage


The best opening – PRIDE GP 2005


Kazushi Sakuraba Entrance


Jason ‘Mayhem’ Miller Dream 9 Entrance


PRIDE FC/ Lenne Hardt Tribute


PRIDE GP 2004 Final Opening


ミルコ・クロコップ vs ヴァンダレイ・シウバ煽り


Genki Sudo Entrance

—-

Pride Fighting Championships (Pride or Pride FC, founded as KRS-Pride) was a Japanese mixed martial arts promotion company founded by Nobuyuki Sakakibara and Nobuhiko Takada. Its inaugural event was held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997. Pride held more than sixty mixed martial arts events, broadcast to about 40 countries worldwide.[1] Pride held the largest live MMA event audience record of 91,107 people at the Pride and K-1 co-production, Shockwave/Dynamite, held in August 2002,[2] as well as the audience record of over 67,450 people at the Pride Final Conflict 2003. For ten years PRIDE was one of the most popular MMA organizations in the world.

In March 2007, Dream Stage Entertainment (DSE) sold Pride to Lorenzo Fertitta and Frank Fertitta III, co-owners of Zuffa, which owns the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[3] While remaining as legally separate entities with separate managements, the two promotions were set to cooperate in a manner akin to the AFL-NFL merger. However, such an arrangement did not materialize, and in October 2007, Pride Worldwide’s Japanese staff was laid off, marking the end of the organization as an active fight promoter. As a result, many of the Pride staff left to form a new organization alongside K-1 parent company Fighting and Entertainment Group. That new organization, founded in February 2008, was named Dream.[4]

In 2015, Pride’s co-founder and former president Nobuyuki Sakakibara established Rizin Fighting Federation in Japan with the same philosophy and ambition as for the defunct Pride organization.[5]

Pride Fighting Championships was initially conceived of in 1997, to match popular Japanese pro-wrestler Nobuhiko Takada with Rickson Gracie, the purported champion of the Gracie family of Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioners. The event, held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997, and organised by the KRS (Kakutougi Revolutionary Spirits) promotion, attracted 47,000 fans, as well as Japanese mass media attention. The success of the first event enabled its promoters to hold a regular series of mixed martial arts events, and a year later in 1998, to promote a rematch between Takada and Gracie.[6] With K-1 enjoying popularity in Japan, Pride began to compete with monthly showings on Fuji Television, as well as pay per view on the newly formed satellite television channel SKY PerfecTV. The series was taken over by the DSE after the dissolvement of the KRS following the fourth event and it was accordingly renamed as the Pride Fighting Championships.

In 2000, Pride hosted the first Pride Grand Prix, a two-part openweight tournament held to find the “world’s best fighter”. The tournament was held over the course of two events, with sixteen fighters competing in an opening round and the eight winners returning three months later for the final round. The second round of the tournament marked the first time Pride was broadcast in the United States and featured American fighter Mark Coleman winning the tournament by defeating Igor Vovchanchyn in the final round.

Sports Editor Playlist part 6

Here is part 6 of my Sports Editor playlist.


Wanderlei Silva Pride Highlight


DREAM / IGF – FieLDS Fight For Japan Genki Desu Ka Omisoka 2011 – Opening Ceremonies 2 – Part 2


PRIDE GP 2006 Mauricio Shogun Rua vs The Snake intro


Lyoto Machida entrance


FieLDS Dynamite!! 2010 – Opening VTR and Opening Ceremonies – HD


DREAM.15 – Opening VTR and Opening Ceremonies


antonio rodrigo “minotauro” nogueira entrance show shockwave 2004


ANDERSON THE SPIDER SILVA ENTRANCE MMA

—-

Dream (styled DREAM in capitals) was a Japanese mixed martial arts (MMA) organization promoted by former PRIDE FC executives and K-1 promoter Fighting and Entertainment Group. DREAM replaced FEG’s previous-run mixed martial arts fight series, Hero’s. The series retained many of the stylistic flourishes and personnel from Pride FC broadcasts, including fight introducer Lenne Hardt. In America, the promotion is aired on HDNet. They promoted over 20 shows highlighting some of the best Japanese and international MMA talent, establishing or enhancing the careers of top ranked fighters such as Shinya Aoki, Gesias Cavalcante, Tatsuya Kawajiri, Ronaldo Jacaré, Eddie Alvarez, Jason Miller, Kazushi Sakuraba, Gegard Mousasi and Alistair Overeem.

Pride FC’s buyout and Yarennoka![edit]
After the Zuffa buyout of Pride FC, the former Dream Stage Entertainment executives put on a collaborative New Year’s Eve mixed martial arts show with Shooto, M-1 Global, and the Fighting and Entertainment Group, called Yarennoka!. This show was intended to be a farewell show of Pride FC. However, due to its success and further petitioning by Japanese MMA fans, the FEG and the former DSE staff decided to combine their efforts and form a new Japanese promotion.

Hero’s dissolution and Dream’s emergence[edit]
Their new promotion was confirmed on February 13, 2008, along with Hero’s dissolution. All of Hero’s’ fighters were confirmed (such as Hero’s champions Norifumi “Kid” Yamamoto, Yoshihiro Akiyama and JZ Calvan) to be part of the new promotion along with the additions of Mirko “Cro Cop” Filipović, Shinya Aoki, Kazushi Sakuraba, Mitsuhiro Ishida, and Hayato “Mach” Sakurai.[1] Another notable announcement was Dream’s partnership with M-1 Global, who confirmed that they would allow the last Heavyweight Champion of Pride FC (and the winner of the 2004 Heavyweight Grand Prix), Fedor Emelianenko, to fight in their events. Emelianenko was present at the Dream press conference to promote the alliance between the two shows.[2]

Partnership with HDNet[edit]
On May 2, 2008, Dream aired for the first time in the United States with a repeat of Dream 1 on HDNet. A repeat of Dream 2 was aired the following day, while Dream 3 was aired live on May 11. All future Dream events will be airing on HDNet as a part of the network’s HDNet Fights series.[3]

Partnership with EliteXC[edit]
On May 10, 2008, Dream announced the working partnership with US promotion EliteXC. The two groups intended to share fighters and eventually co-promote shows. However, with EliteXC went bankrupt before the alliance could materialize.[4]

Sports Editor Playlist part 5

Here is part 5 of my Sports Editor playlist


Korean Zombie – Chan Sung Jung


Big George Foreman – Highlights & Knockouts


Minotauro Nogueira Highlight


Antonio Rogerio Minotouro Nogueira Highlights [HELLO JAPAN]


‘Hands of Steel’ – Junior Dos Santos Highlights by CT [HD 720p]


Jose Aldo MMA Highlight


Rich Franklin UFC 103 Entrance


PRIDE Open Weight Gp 2006 Final intro

—-

Pride Fighting Championships (Pride or Pride FC, founded as KRS-Pride) was a Japanese mixed martial arts promotion company founded by Nobuyuki Sakakibara and Nobuhiko Takada. Its inaugural event was held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997. Pride held more than sixty mixed martial arts events, broadcast to about 40 countries worldwide.[1] Pride held the largest live MMA event audience record of 91,107 people at the Pride and K-1 co-production, Shockwave/Dynamite, held in August 2002,[2] as well as the audience record of over 67,450 people at the Pride Final Conflict 2003. For ten years PRIDE was one of the most popular MMA organizations in the world.

In March 2007, Dream Stage Entertainment (DSE) sold Pride to Lorenzo Fertitta and Frank Fertitta III, co-owners of Zuffa, which owns the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[3] While remaining as legally separate entities with separate managements, the two promotions were set to cooperate in a manner akin to the AFL-NFL merger. However, such an arrangement did not materialize, and in October 2007, Pride Worldwide’s Japanese staff was laid off, marking the end of the organization as an active fight promoter. As a result, many of the Pride staff left to form a new organization alongside K-1 parent company Fighting and Entertainment Group. That new organization, founded in February 2008, was named Dream.[4]

In 2015, Pride’s co-founder and former president Nobuyuki Sakakibara established Rizin Fighting Federation in Japan with the same philosophy and ambition as for the defunct Pride organization.[5]

Pride Fighting Championships was initially conceived of in 1997, to match popular Japanese pro-wrestler Nobuhiko Takada with Rickson Gracie, the purported champion of the Gracie family of Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioners. The event, held at the Tokyo Dome on October 11, 1997, and organised by the KRS (Kakutougi Revolutionary Spirits) promotion, attracted 47,000 fans, as well as Japanese mass media attention. The success of the first event enabled its promoters to hold a regular series of mixed martial arts events, and a year later in 1998, to promote a rematch between Takada and Gracie.[6] With K-1 enjoying popularity in Japan, Pride began to compete with monthly showings on Fuji Television, as well as pay per view on the newly formed satellite television channel SKY PerfecTV. The series was taken over by the DSE after the dissolvement of the KRS following the fourth event and it was accordingly renamed as the Pride Fighting Championships.

In 2000, Pride hosted the first Pride Grand Prix, a two-part openweight tournament held to find the “world’s best fighter”. The tournament was held over the course of two events, with sixteen fighters competing in an opening round and the eight winners returning three months later for the final round. The second round of the tournament marked the first time Pride was broadcast in the United States and featured American fighter Mark Coleman winning the tournament by defeating Igor Vovchanchyn in the final round.

Sports Playlist part 4

Here are eight more videos that are a part of my playlist.


Cat Zingano’s emotional UFC Entrance. Great moment in history edited out of FX broadcast


Wanderlei Silva Entrance UFC:Japan 2013/ UFC On Fuel 8


Mike Tyson Knockout Highlights


Korean Zombie Entrance – UFC on Fuel 3


Pride GP 2003 Opening + Entrances: Best ever


Wanderlei Silva Highlight 2011 ”The Axe Murderer”


PRIDE GRAND PRIX 2005 開幕戦 選手紹介


DREAM / IGF – FieLDS Fight For Japan Genki Desu Ka Omisoka 2011 – Opening Ceremonies 1